XXX Chats

30 year old dating younger man

Dating and violence

A person who is violent (emotionally or physically) should address the issue with a trained professional such as a counselor or therapist.

When we talk about major concerns facing LGBTQ youth, we typically discuss topics like bias-based bullying and harassment or familial rejection and homelessness; and when we talk about violence facing the larger LGBTQ community, we typically discuss hate crimes.

In other words, we talk about the violence facing our community from those outside it, from those who are openly homophobic and transphobic, but what about the violence happening within our community?

Physical abuse is when a person touches your body in an unwanted or violent way.

Physical abuse also includes sexual abuse, which is any sexual contact that you don’t want.

While 29 percent of heterosexual youth surveyed reported being physically abused by dating partners, for example, 42.8 percent of LGB youth reported the same.

dating and violence-16

The rates of sexual victimization for LGB respondents was 23.2 percent, nearly double that of heterosexual youth, of whom 12.3 percent reported sexual coercion.Emotional abuse and physical abuse are both very serious.Both types of abuse have very serious consequences for both the victim and the abuser.about 10 percent of high school students reported experiencing physical or sexual dating violence.Unfortunately, most studies of IPV in the LGBTQ community focus exclusively on adults, and most studies of teen dating violence fail to take into account respondents’ sexual orientation or gender identity.Moreover, these myths further marginalize LGBTQ survivors’ who may already be more reluctant to report their abuse or access counseling and other resources because they fear being discriminated against or outed as LGBTQ.If you are a teen who wants to know if your relationship is healthy or if there may be some warning signs that could lead to TDV, Love Is has LGBTQ-inclusive information and an interactive quiz.It’s important to know that both guys and girls can commit dating violence.In addition, girls aren’t always the victims of dating violence. In fact, sometimes partners commit physical and emotional abuse.As difficult as it may be to admit, LGBTQ people – including LGBTQ youth – can be and are perpetrators of violence as well as its victims, and too often, that violence occurs in the context of romantic and/or sexual relationships.According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), lesbians and gay men experience equal or higher levels of intimate partner violence (IPV) as heterosexuals, with bisexual women suffering much higher rates of IPV in comparison to lesbians, gay men and heterosexual women.

Comments Dating and violence